Wings For My Pillow

Feather by Feather

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Unpopular Opinion Time

Misha Collins is not Castiel.  I really have no additional desire to watch Ringer just because he’s going to be in it.  If sentimentality for actors who have previously portrayed characters I loved was all it took, I’d be watching the show already for Sarah Michelle Gellar.

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euclase:

color perception with dean winchester: a teeny guide
sometimes people ask me how to get the right colors in a drawing. i thought i’d use dean winchester to explain a few things. because he’s pretty (makeup and tv lighting notwithstanding, of course).
i broke these shots up to show some parallels. in each shot, i pulled the main three skin colors off of dean’s face (a light, middle, and dark value). then, i took those three colors and placed them alongside the three colors in the frame next to it. you can see how the colors change from one lighting to the next. and hopefully you can tell what’s happening: skin color changes dramatically depending on the lighting.
obvious, right? but sometimes it helps to see it.
you can also see, from row to row, how surrounding colors can influence your perception of color. take row 1, for example. against a pale sky, dean’s skin color appears to be dark and rich. but in the second shot, against dark trees, the same colors appear brighter.
same thing with hue. in the third row, dean’s skin colors look warmer in the first frame. but the same colors look cooler in the second frame. that’s because the surrounding colors in each frame—sunny outdoors versus a cool interior—influence our perception.
the trick, then, is to try to ignore the influence of other colors and to train your eyes to isolate the ones you want. there are lots of ways to do that…
break mental stereotypes. dean’s skin is not peach-colored. peaches aren’t peach-colored, for that matter. a peach can look blue if it’s inside a blue glass vase. dean’s skin can look gray if he’s in a cold room. it can look brilliant orange if he’s near a fire. don’t succumb to crayola crayon thinking. because even a red crayon doesn’t always look red.
look past the object. your eyes work better when they’re relaxed. so try a little exercise right now: look across the top of your computer, relax your eyes, and keep the tumblr dashboard “blue” just below your point of focus. your eyes have now stopped seeing “computer” and “window” and “borders” and all the rest of the “knowledge” your brain is super eager to categorize. now, your relaxed eyes just see the blue. and it’s easier for your eyes to identify that shade of blue without the influence of that other knowledge. you could probably pick out the same blue in paint or pencil if someone asked you to, and it would probably be pretty damn accurate. :)
isolate the colors. try making a pinhole using your fist to look through. use anything, really. use a piece of paper to cover up the other colors if you have to. the point is to isolate one color so you can see it without the influence of surrounding colors. if you do this enough, eventually, your eyes will get better at isolating the colors without the help of pinholes or pieces of paper. you’ll start to see individual colors by habit. i promise! it just takes practice.
get some paint chips and make color flash cards. this sounds silly, but it works. get the kind of paint chips that come in single colors (not the long strips with different shades of the same color). get a bunch of colors that look similar to each other (a group of yellows, a group of greens, and so on). try spreading them out on different surfaces in different lighting conditions, and practice telling them apart. see if you can pick out the slate blue from the storm blue in a pile of blues, or the brick red from the barn red. your eyes will learn to see the subtle differences between the colors regardless of their surroundings.
keep a color wheel around. if you come across a color you’re having trouble identifying, you can use the color wheel to help. either by laying the wheel right next to the color, or by mental process of elimination. ask yourself: is the color closer to red or green? is it closer to orange or yellow? is it closer to brown or gray? keep circling the wheel until you narrow it down. again, it gets easier with practice. 
once you get the hang of this stuff, you’ll find your eyes will start to make color decisions more easily. it’s kind of like a muscle you can exercise, yeah?
if you keep practicing, you’ll start to not only perceive colors more accurately, but you’ll learn how fluid the colors are and how much they want to work together, even as you get used to isolating them—especially on skin. colors are really married together on skin, almost like they’re on a scale. you’ll start to learn how light does different things to different parts of the face, and you’ll start to learn which colors usually go together on someone’s nose, for example, or on their ear.
right. :)
so i hope some of this helps you. thank you for reading!

euclase:

color perception with dean winchester: a teeny guide

sometimes people ask me how to get the right colors in a drawing. i thought i’d use dean winchester to explain a few things. because he’s pretty (makeup and tv lighting notwithstanding, of course).

i broke these shots up to show some parallels. in each shot, i pulled the main three skin colors off of dean’s face (a light, middle, and dark value). then, i took those three colors and placed them alongside the three colors in the frame next to it. you can see how the colors change from one lighting to the next. and hopefully you can tell what’s happening: skin color changes dramatically depending on the lighting.

obvious, right? but sometimes it helps to see it.

you can also see, from row to row, how surrounding colors can influence your perception of color. take row 1, for example. against a pale sky, dean’s skin color appears to be dark and rich. but in the second shot, against dark trees, the same colors appear brighter.

same thing with hue. in the third row, dean’s skin colors look warmer in the first frame. but the same colors look cooler in the second frame. that’s because the surrounding colors in each frame—sunny outdoors versus a cool interior—influence our perception.

the trick, then, is to try to ignore the influence of other colors and to train your eyes to isolate the ones you want. there are lots of ways to do that…

  1. break mental stereotypes. dean’s skin is not peach-colored. peaches aren’t peach-colored, for that matter. a peach can look blue if it’s inside a blue glass vase. dean’s skin can look gray if he’s in a cold room. it can look brilliant orange if he’s near a fire. don’t succumb to crayola crayon thinking. because even a red crayon doesn’t always look red.
  2. look past the object. your eyes work better when they’re relaxed. so try a little exercise right now: look across the top of your computer, relax your eyes, and keep the tumblr dashboard “blue” just below your point of focus. your eyes have now stopped seeing “computer” and “window” and “borders” and all the rest of the “knowledge” your brain is super eager to categorize. now, your relaxed eyes just see the blue. and it’s easier for your eyes to identify that shade of blue without the influence of that other knowledge. you could probably pick out the same blue in paint or pencil if someone asked you to, and it would probably be pretty damn accurate. :)
  3. isolate the colors. try making a pinhole using your fist to look through. use anything, really. use a piece of paper to cover up the other colors if you have to. the point is to isolate one color so you can see it without the influence of surrounding colors. if you do this enough, eventually, your eyes will get better at isolating the colors without the help of pinholes or pieces of paper. you’ll start to see individual colors by habit. i promise! it just takes practice.
  4. get some paint chips and make color flash cards. this sounds silly, but it works. get the kind of paint chips that come in single colors (not the long strips with different shades of the same color). get a bunch of colors that look similar to each other (a group of yellows, a group of greens, and so on). try spreading them out on different surfaces in different lighting conditions, and practice telling them apart. see if you can pick out the slate blue from the storm blue in a pile of blues, or the brick red from the barn red. your eyes will learn to see the subtle differences between the colors regardless of their surroundings.
  5. keep a color wheel around. if you come across a color you’re having trouble identifying, you can use the color wheel to help. either by laying the wheel right next to the color, or by mental process of elimination. ask yourself: is the color closer to red or green? is it closer to orange or yellow? is it closer to brown or gray? keep circling the wheel until you narrow it down. again, it gets easier with practice. 

once you get the hang of this stuff, you’ll find your eyes will start to make color decisions more easily. it’s kind of like a muscle you can exercise, yeah?

if you keep practicing, you’ll start to not only perceive colors more accurately, but you’ll learn how fluid the colors are and how much they want to work together, even as you get used to isolating them—especially on skin. colors are really married together on skin, almost like they’re on a scale. you’ll start to learn how light does different things to different parts of the face, and you’ll start to learn which colors usually go together on someone’s nose, for example, or on their ear.

right. :)

so i hope some of this helps you. thank you for reading!

(via euclasedeac)